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News and current activities from the India-UK Water Centre. Sign-up to the Open Network to receive news updates via our newsletter.

IUKWC News

The World Economic Forum published their Global Risks Report 2020 last week (15th January 2020). The Climate Crisis and the Water Crisis continue to dominate the Global Risk Register. Supporting science and innovation for catchment management has never been more important.

Satellite soil moisture observations can be used to improve flood forecasting and drought monitoring, and they also show promise for supporting commercial agricultural services (e.g. assessing crop conditions, predicting yields and monitoring irrigation) and government decision making.

Aerogels are the world’s lightest solid material and are similar in construction to open cell foams. Early aerogels made of silica were termed ‘blue smoke’ due to their optical properties and are >95% empty space, possess mechanical strength, excellent thermal properties and elasticity (Kistler and Caldwell, 1934). Aerogels have evolved since the 30’s and now can be made from a number of precursors including polymers, metal oxides, Graphene and Carbon Nanotubes. This diversity of precursors has led to a wide range of applications, for example, water and air filtration, insulation on space probes and energy storage for Li-ion batteries (Bheekhun et al., 2013, Duxbury, 2001). For more details click here
The River Mithi Catchment investigation was only one day in a week of action research which involved a wider UK team, a range of stakeholders, the INTCATCH water quality monitoring boat, some amazing community meetings and engaging with the Thane Pollution Control Board. The week ended in style on Versova Beach joining more the 3000 people taking action as part of the Worlds biggest beach clean on International Coastal Clean Up Day. For more details, click here
The coastal region of Sundarbans is fertile, but highly vulnerable to natural and human-made hazards (IPCC, 2007). Over the past century, cyclones, sea level rise, increased salinity, reduced freshwater supply, embankment deterioration, to name a few, have taken their toll on human life and property, and for this reason, Sundarbans is considered to be one of the most hazardous areas of the Indian subcontinent (IPCC, 2007).

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